I am a foreigner

"Why was being a foreigner a problem though? It isn’t wrong. It’s not a bad thing, nor anything to be ashamed of. It simply means ‘I’m not from around here.’ But in my mind to be called a local would have meant that I had made it – that I had fully adapted and that I ‘belonged.’ And while it is important and recommendable to assimilate into the local culture where you are, it is equally important to remember that the world is not our home," said OMer Rebecca

Crossing borders

''But the world needs many more heroes. It needs people who are willing to go without knowing whether they will come back. We need risk-takers who step out and face the difficulty of opposition because it is the right thing to do,'' said OMer Anja. ''We need people who go out and cross difficult borders because God’s name needs to be proclaimed. These borders might not be physical. The difficulties might look different. But they are still there, they are still difficult and they still need to be crossed.''

To touch the 'untouchable'

"This story brings me back to my knees in prayer for God’s forgiveness and love," shared OMer Ivy. "My love is too limited and I need God to help me overcome the fear...I need to daily remind myself that love is the reason why I am here and it’s risky. I know there will be times when I want to run away and pray from a distance, but instead I need to run to God and ask for His power and love to fill me and help me reach out my hand to touch the 'untouchable.'"

Back to work

"Officially, I have been “out of work” for six years. That ended abruptly 18 months ago, when I woke up one morning and said to my wife, 'I have a feeling I am going back to work,'" said OMer Daniel.

Leaving Egypt

"And yet, in this season of my life, I read [the Israelites] moans and I have compassion," shared OMer Sarah. "Yes, being thousands of years removed from it, and knowing the whole story, we can look in disbelief.  But in that moment–yes they had been freed from slavery–but they had also left their homes. They had been in a place where they had grown, where their parents had grown and died.  Where they had roots. Where they knew the streets, and the places to rest. Maybe the best place to buy bread, or the best place to watch the sunrise. They left a place of memories of seeing their children run and play and laugh. They left their homes where their children had crawled and walked for the first time, and where they had sung praises to God together."

Buying the knife

"I suppose that’s what I wanted to grasp onto—why I was so quick to buy the knife," shared OMer Andrew. "When I return to America this month, I’m not just taking a bunch of disconnected experiences in a vacuum. I’m taking a completely different outlook on life."

Zero is a number too

"In the Bible, the New Testament often uses the analogy of a human body to illustrate the church. The illustration is that the body is composed of many members with many gifts and abilities and because of that we can achieve more," shared OMer Simon. "But you don’t hear the hands taking credit over the head or the head over the legs. Yet, in my discussions with my wife, I seem to forget this important lesson."

'Life with God in a different land'

"Once, a friend back home messaged me and said, 'I’m so surprised you have internet. I thought you were struggling over there with no electricity out in the jungle,'" said OMer Ava. "Another friend when he heard I was making dinner said, 'I thought you guys had someone to do all your cooking, cleaning, shopping and all you have to do is ministry.' At first, I thought these comments were quite absurd, but then I realised that I would have thought the same thing if I wasn’t here."

No more goodbyes

"How do we allow our kids to process, to grieve well, when we're so busy trying to deal with our own grief and pain and stress of transition? How do I model healthy grieving for my kids when it takes all my effort not to collapse in a puddle on the airport floor when I'm saying goodbye?" wondered OMer Beth. 

Wish it were true

"I read something in my cabin from the seventeenth century French Philosopher, Blaise Pascal, that startled me," said OMer Richard. "He said that there is little point trying to persuade people with Christian belief. Instead, the way to impact people was that, having caught a glimpse of this rich and satisfying life that was being offered, to make people wish that it were true."

Pray Give Go

"The great thing about Discovery Bible Study is that you figure out the text as you go along," explained OMer Renette. "As people shared what they learnt about God and about man in this passage, we all started talking about the different roles each of them had. Moses’ solely role was to keep the rod up, Joshua oversaw the battle and Aaron and Hur were there to support Moses. It struck me that this is an example of the tagline we have in OM: Pray, Give, Go."

What I know now

"What would I tell that 19-year-old girl boarding her flight to leave home? Tears in her eyes saying goodbye to her family, but unbelievably excited to start an adventure," wondered OMer Jessie. "To be honest, I think if I could have told her all the amazing things that would happen she might not have gotten on that flight. For that 19-year-old girl it would have been too much to know all the beautiful and challenging things God had in store for her."