All in South Asia

Happy endings

“As I watched the ending scene (that lasted about three minutes) I thought about the “happy ending” notion,” says Ava. “Is it real or is it a fairy tale? A utopia created by Hollywood to give their viewers a false sense of hope in the reality of a broken world? And so, I said to myself: I believe in happy endings.”

Why we help

“In the face of this devastating poverty, I feel a sickening sense that there is no way to help; that any programme we organised, any aid given or any message shared would not be enough to bring a real change,” shares Ellyn. “It is only when I learn to see their beauty—the person that God crafted them to be—that I feel hope in the fact that they too were created by God and placed here on earth for a purpose.”

A letter from mommy to mommy: part II

“After interviewing these women, I realised that their stories impacted me way more than I expected them to,” admits Ava. “It gave me a glimpse of the true reality of living out your life as a believing mother. The reality that loving and being obedient to God could mean going to a developing country or a high-security risk country closed off to the gospel, downsizing your comfort level or just doing the things that seem like the hardest thing to do in your life all because God said to do it.”

A letter from mommy to mommy: part I

“I wanted to know what it takes to be a missionary mom, a mom living cross-culturally or just a believing mother. I think it is important for single missionaries—and young ladies in general—to take note of what they have to say to help build a foundation for our future lives as missionary moms or moms who follow Jesus,” explains Ava. “To achieve this task, well, to some degree, I talked with three mothers, from three different countries, in three different stages in their lives.”

Join me

“After a few days of trekking up the mountain, we arrived at the village we would call home for the next couple of weeks,” explains OMer Ava. “The challenges began as a lot of what we planned to do changed spur of the moment. As we faithfully trudged through the days and went with the flow of the culture, we kept our plan to pray every day for one hour and fast every week for the community. Even though many of the people didn’t seem open or too interested in Jesus, spending a lot of time with God kept us hopeful.”

'Life with God in a different land'

"Once, a friend back home messaged me and said, 'I’m so surprised you have internet. I thought you were struggling over there with no electricity out in the jungle,'" said OMer Ava. "Another friend when he heard I was making dinner said, 'I thought you guys had someone to do all your cooking, cleaning, shopping and all you have to do is ministry.' At first, I thought these comments were quite absurd, but then I realised that I would have thought the same thing if I wasn’t here."

A season under the sun

"For me, I have to constantly remind myself that there are many seasons in my life because it helps me to be focused, disciplined, grateful and motivated," shared OMer Ava. "It does this for me because I’m reminded that once the season is over I can never go back to it. I may go through another very similar season but never the exact thing."

God uses your differences

“If you go to there, you’ll be the first brown missionary they've ever seen,” warned one missionary to me as I prepared to serve God in South Asia," OMer Ava remembered . "I laughed at those words, not knowing how much they would affect my daily life when I moved to Asia in January 2017."