All in Central Asia

No more goodbyes

"How do we allow our kids to process, to grieve well, when we're so busy trying to deal with our own grief and pain and stress of transition? How do I model healthy grieving for my kids when it takes all my effort not to collapse in a puddle on the airport floor when I'm saying goodbye?" wondered OMer Beth. 

Being thankful

"A new year. A time to look back and a time to look ahead. Of course there are lots of memories from this past year. And when I sit down and think, even more come. Memories that make me smile and memories that hurt and make me sad," shared OMer Loïs. "As I go over this year, I feel it has been hard in different ways. I can honestly say that it has been one of the hardest years of being on the field."

Be a 'safe space'

"This is what I pray as I meet with younger women," shared OMer Beth. "That I can be a safe space for them; that they can trust me, be honest with me and that I can speak God’s truth into their lives. I don’t know all the answers and I can’t heal the brokenness, but I can point them to Jesus who can do all that and more!"

Raising African kids in a Central Asian country

"Each day is a challenge for me and my African kids as they grow up in Central Asia," shared OMer Beth. "Some days we hide them behind us and other days we make the decision to encourage our kids to have that photo taken. Each day is an opportunity for me and my family to trust God more and to depend on His love and care for us."

Lessons on humility and hygiene

"Growing up in a household with two sisters, no brothers and a mother who was committed to raising ladies, potty talk was not encouraged," said OMer Ellyn. "However, after almost eight years of living mostly in Asia, my view on potty talk has changed; not because I’ve become vulgar, but because I’ve realized the reality and the humanity of the subject."

The value of team

"Team is one of those things we sometimes wish we weren't a part of, but mostly are so thankful that we are!" shared OMer Beth. "You can't choose your team (for the most part) just like you can't choose your family."

Am I doing enough?

"As an occupational therapist I do rehab and work with the families as best as I can, but as a foreign missionary working with poorer families I often have many more resources at my disposal than the locals do," shared OMer Beth. "Should I be giving money or the specialized equipment that the families often need? When does helping hurt those I’m working with? When does giving cause dependency on foreign resources and take away the pride and self-satisfaction of hard work of those who are on the receiving end?"

My little hero

Are we doing the right thing? What can I do? Why do people humiliate each other in such a way? If only I had a chance to change the system, if only there could be some encouragement. Why, God, why?

Through a situation with her son Loïs leant that to hand over the problem to God and trust Him with the future.