When Muslims are more like Jesus than I am

“While I waited the remaining few minutes for my flight, I processed what had just happened. I recognised too much of the ‘Good Samaritan’ parable in the situation, and, unfortunately, I wasn’t the unlikely passer-by who went out of the way to help: it was the Muslim woman,” shares OMer Erin.

Acceptance and then achievement

“With the helplessness has come the realisation that I’ve been depending on my works a lot,” shares OMer Beth. “It’s great to have tear-jerking stories of all the families our disability project is helping for our newsletters. I like feeling worthwhile because of the difference I am making in somebody’s life. What I do outside of our home has given me worth and significance.”

Let us go around the walls again

“When I read the Bible, I sometimes even pretend that I am interviewing the characters. This helps me find new insights in the scripture. Recently I came across the story of the wall of Jericho. As I acted out the scene in my brain, I imagined it in a gaming style,” says OMer Ivy.

Pub prayers for revival

“Looking around that pub at the various people enjoying their tea, I started really thinking about what he’d said,” Hannah remembers. “Praying for revival…In a country that many have come to learn is spiritually dark, have we given up on praying for the people? Has the belief in revival died, or are we still trusting that God can move in a mighty way?”

Cling like a gecko

“‘…cling to what is good.’ I want to cling to what is good in the Lord’s eyes with all my strength,” says OMer Rebecca. “Cling like my life is on the line. Cling to His goodness. Cling to His grace. Cling to His love. Cling to His Word. Cling to His promises. For I know they are good.”

Love yourself

“It struck me the other day that I can only love others as much as I love myself,” shares OMer Renette. “Now that I say it, it sounds so obvious. If there is something I struggle to love about myself—like my weight or lack of self-confidence—then these are the things I also struggle to love in others. If someone has more confidence than I have, jealousy creeps in and I struggle to love their confidence.”

Hats

“I do not recall wearing many different hats ever. I only used them while travelling in some hot countries. Of course, I couldn’t survive without one during our Missions Discipleship Training in South Africa. Not just to protect myself against the sun in the desert, but also to cover my hair on bad-hair-days during long outreaches, without comfortable showers,” shares Loïs. “These days I only count one hat in my wardrobe. Nevertheless I have the feeling that I am changing hats all the time. My different roles make me do so.”

GPS as a guide

“Lost in wonder at His greatness, I marvelled at the beauty of God’s creation as the car wound its way down a narrow country lane. Then I suddenly realised that not ONLY was I lost in wonder, I was also lost altogether! How had it all gone wrong?” thought OMer Paul. “No satnav! It’s not that I didn’t have one in the car, it’s just that I chose not to use it. And that got me thinking about how similar, in some ways, a satnav is to the Bible!”

We are not a travel agency

“…to many host ministries, short-term outreaches can be a blessing or a curse,” shares OMer Ivy. “Here I would like to share some tips that help me feel less like a tour guide and more like I’m helping facilitate an exposure trip for the Kingdom.”

Stuck in the mud

“Just like the children’s game ‘stuck in the mud’ we need others to help us, to set us free. Sometimes the game gets so crazy that people don’t know you are stuck and need help," explains OMer Renette.

Choices and questions

“Did we pray enough? Did we ask the right questions? Did we challenge them enough? Should we have invited them to spend more time with us? Did we fail?” These are some of the questions that OMer Beth wrestles with when a friend marries a non-believer.

Turn to Him

“People would ask me how it was going, how I liked the city, and without fail some comment about the weather would pop out of my mouth quicker than I could swallow it back. The weather. That’s what I chose to talk about day after day. Because it was safe,” shares OMer Rebecca. “I didn’t want to admit it, but I was struggling. I wasn’t sure what I was doing or where I was going in life. But saying that I was struggling out loud felt like failing and I am not one for failure.”