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OM Celebrates 60 Years


 

The roadside stands of Madagascar

I am captivated by roadside stands.

Growing up in Canada, the most common stands I saw were run by five-year-olds, selling too-sugary lemonade in plastic cups.

Having travelled a bit since then, I've seen stands selling just about every imaginable thing--pots and pans, animals, buttons, blankets, food, clothing, furniture. Who needs a building to run a business when you can set up a tarp just about anywhere?

Even more than the stands, I love to see the faces behind them.

A woman with four children playing in the dirt beside her, setting out clothing.

An old man, too stiff to do anything else, selling fruit.

Some grow and sell their own products. Others buy and re-sell. All use these small roadside businesses to provide income for their families.

The following photos were taken in Madagascar:

I passed these two ladies every day I was in Ambovombe. In the morning, they would set up their machines, haul out the bags of projects, and set to work, sewing until it grew dark.

Most of the sellers are out all day hawking their wares. A woman rests against the cage containing the chickens she hopes to sell.

Cows are plentiful in the south, and so are cow products. Working along the road, this man crafts sandals from cowhides. Each pair of sandals sells for around 5,000 Malagasy ariary, about two U.S. dollars.

Cassava is a staple food in the south of Madagascar. Beside the roads, there are many people selling it, such as this man.

Stands with homemade food are very common, mostly various deep-fried goods.

Various rice and beans are sold along the road. Many Malagasy people eat rice three times a day. 

Finding identity in Christ's eyes, not the world's

Finding identity in Christ's eyes, not the world's

American food brings people together in Southeast Asia

American food brings people together in Southeast Asia