All in Culture Shock

Reverse cultural shock

I think sometimes we are afraid of what it could mean to give up everything and follow Christ. We try to explain it by saying “Jesus meant ... when he said that!” and start shaping our lives and Jesus into a version we are more comfortable with. A Jesus who wants us to live a balanced life, nothing too extreme (He would never ask us to leave our closest people behind!), and wants us to be comfortable and have an abundance of everything. 

I could choose to live my life as I once did  enjoying church on Sundays and seeking success based on what other people say: a family, a house, a car and a nice job. Or I could take an honest look at Jesus in the Bible and be willing to face the consequences of what might happen if I really believe and obey Him.

 

Heart of worship

"Maybe I needed to be set apart that first evening, though, so that I could perceive my prejudices and learn to tune my heart, again, to worship the God who is bigger—much bigger—than my comfort zone."

OMer Nicole shares what she learnt about worship, and herself, during a church youth event in North Africa. 

5 tips for a better transition

Reverse Culture Shock. Re-Entry. Transition. All terms for an elusive feeling that is difficult to define and even more difficult to explain. It's not easy. It's not simple. And it's definitely a process. So if you're in the midst of tough transition right now, here are a few tips for riding out the storm. 

When you're a foreigner in your own country

Some of the dictionary definitions of a foreigner say that it is “a person not naturalised to the country,” an “alien to the country,” or “a person from outside one’s community.” I have my fair share of experience with that. But sometimes, I have experienced this in my home country, too. And that made me feel even more like a foreigner than I ever did with any other foreign experience I've had before.

Depression and the missionary life

Depression and its closely-related cousin, anxiety, are complex and controversial topics in church circles even without the complication of international missions work. Yet it's a conversation we need to have, because our people are suffering, usually in silence.